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ddwjg
20th Sep 2011, 03:44
It's ok to get all 'jai rawn' in the Amphur,

Bifftastic. You keep putting Thai in your posts.

What does "jai rawn" mean? Or are you being selective as to who can understand your posts?

I know "jai dee" means "good hearted." so when I read those words "jai rawn" means "hot hearted".:confused:

Dave.


[Admin Edit: Posts #1 thru #9 and #14 moved from another thread to here by request]

tangmo
20th Sep 2011, 08:47
i think it means hot headed, im learnin thai, but if im wrong sorry.

dan&ploy
20th Sep 2011, 09:44
You are right, watermelon.

Gary & Nok
20th Sep 2011, 12:08
Thats my Dogs name, one of them anyway (dogs not names) although sometimes... :D

bifftastic
20th Sep 2011, 13:05
Bifftastic. You keep putting Thai in your posts.

What does "jai rawn" mean? Or are you being selective as to who can understand your posts?

I know "jai dee" means "good hearted." so when I read those words "jai rawn" means "hot hearted".:confused:

Dave.

Sorry, didn't mean to exclude anyone. :) Kind of assumed (yes I know, I shouldn't) that some Thai would be understood here.

'Jai rawn' does indeed literally translate as 'hot heart' but means angry. The opposite of which is 'jai yen' which you will hear people say when someone is getting worked up a bit 'jai yen yen na' (calm down).

Again, please accept my apologies for posting things that are not understandable to all. :wai:

ddwjg
20th Sep 2011, 15:10
Bifftastic, Going back to the "hot heart" thing. I remember seeing a documentary once where an expat who had been in Thailand for thirty years plus, said " The way to understand the Thai people is that they think with their heart, and not their head." It would therefore make sense that "jai rawn" would be taken as meaning "hot-headed".

I always thought that "angry" was something that sounds like "mor hor".

Dave.

bifftastic
20th Sep 2011, 16:04
Yes, there are a few words for 'angry' I suppose 'jai rawn' would be more 'quick tempered, rash, hot tempered'

I've heard it used as a description of someone who was (at that particular moment) angry though.

Another is 'arom sia' which literally means 'mood broken', in a bad mood or upset 'arom mai dee' would be 'in a bad mood' as well.

Here's a few more http://thai-language.com/dicthttp://thai-language.com/dict

T (http://thai-language.com/dict)here are probably many ways to describe things, and as the Thai language doesn't have the links to English that other European languages do, sometimes a literal translation doesn't really work so we have to go with the nearest that makes sense.

It's interesting what you say though about the 'Thai heart' an interesting example would be 'kao jai' 'understand' which has the literal meaning of 'enter' (kao) 'heart' (jai). Our version of the same meaning 'under' and 'stand' has been claimed to mean 'amongst the meaning' but others say its from Aramahic 'andha' via Spanish/French 'entiende'. We seldom think of standing under or amongst things when we comprehend them, we just use the word and know what it means.

A lot of Thai is centered around the word 'jai' and I think heart is too simple a translation. Also, when words are combined, as they often are, they become more than the individual meanings of those words.

I have had it explained to me that 'jai' means heart, spirit and mind! More specifically 'hua jai' as you will hear in many many Thai songs, is 'heart' the one that can be broken :)

It's all confusing, but enjoyably so, I find :)

tangmo
20th Sep 2011, 21:20
your right biff, it is confusing i am learning thai and nearly packed it in last week but i won't give up, i tried my thai on a thai friend at the weekend. i tried asking her if she could drive a car and she fell about laughing, she said to me, did a want to sing a song. my husband said as a driver i would make a good singer, but after another lesson this week i can now ask her can she drive a car.

bifftastic
20th Sep 2011, 21:28
No, don't give up! :)

The tones get you all 'sing song-like' at first but then, when you start to understand Thai people speaking, they don't really use them that often to be honest! (shhh it's s secret!) ;)

The odd word here and there goes up a bit, down a bit, but mostly it's all blended in together and pretty much tone-friendly. If you speak quickly, there just isn't time for all that rising and falling stuff!

Unless of course you ask someone if they can pass a car through their bowels rather than drive it :D

Why is it that those two words are so similar? :lol: it's just asking for trouble!

bifftastic
20th Sep 2011, 21:36
I've started a new thread because a discussion in another thread has wandered off topic but the comments were interesting and I feel they warrant further discussion :)

I'll be contacting the mods to see if they can move those comments to this thread instead :)

Cheers,

Biff


[Admin Edit: Posts #1 thru #9 and #14 moved from another thread to here by request]

KhunIanB-UK
20th Sep 2011, 21:53
Good Idea, khid Dee (think good).

bifftastic
20th Sep 2011, 22:15
Khaaap :)
Kid dee tam dee dai dee, khap :wai: (think good, do good, receive good) I try! I wonder if going off topic generates really bad karma?

colin244
20th Sep 2011, 23:56
I wonder if going off topic generates really bad karma?

Probably som nam nar if you get infraction points for it ;)

colin 244

dan&ploy
21st Sep 2011, 00:27
Why is it that those two words are so similar? it's just asking for trouble!It is deliberate Biffy. Same as why the similarity between milk and my favourite part of a woman's anatomy and between banana and Ploy's least favourite part of my anatomy, (although it is surely too small to be intrusive!).

te2008
21st Sep 2011, 11:50
My mother in law looked at me and said the word Goong. Does anyone know what does that word ( Goong) mean.

A Thai friend of mine ( male) said that word means scared. When I asked a female Thai friend of mine, she replied and said Goong is a bad word...So I am a little bit confused

ddwjg
21st Sep 2011, 14:44
I always thought it meant 'prawn'. Obviously the sound of the word you heard must have been different.

Dave.

bifftastic
21st Sep 2011, 15:10
Goong, กุ้ง (falling tone) is 'prawn' or 'shrimp'

สมองกุ้ง 'samong goong' is literally 'brain shrimp' or shrimp-brain :) which would be 'idiot' or 'small minded'

Was that what you heard?

There are all kinds of insults, but I try to steer clear of them :) not a good idea to start cursing in a foreign language I think!

te2008
21st Sep 2011, 16:03
Goong, กุ้ง (falling tone) is 'prawn' or 'shrimp'

สมองกุ้ง 'samong goong' is literally 'brain shrimp' or shrimp-brain :) which would be 'idiot' or 'small minded' !

Maybe she thinks that I am a idiot because I don't throw my money around

bifftastic
21st Sep 2011, 16:15
Maybe she thinks that I am a idiot because I don't throw my money around

Maybe, but she'd be wrong about that :)

What exactly did she say? Was it just one word? Did you pick up a bad vibe from what she said?

millermac
21st Sep 2011, 19:34
My wife says samong goong, scare people kee go on head. I am none the wiser though I know what kee means!

bifftastic
21st Sep 2011, 19:36
kee for brains? :D

millermac
21st Sep 2011, 19:38
sounds about right :thumb:

colin244
21st Sep 2011, 21:22
Hands up I thought goong was prawn too :confused:

colin 244

bifftastic
21st Sep 2011, 21:32
It is prawn, they just add the word สมอง 'samong' (brain) to say that someone's got the brains of a prawn ie. not very big :)

the_link
21st Sep 2011, 22:09
Either way, te2008, not edifying in the least if this is what you heard from said mother-in-law.

Next time you are handing out the 1000 baht notes, make sure she misses her turn. :)

colin244
21st Sep 2011, 23:24
Next time you are handing out the 1000 baht notes, make sure she misses her turn. :)

Will he get away with it though?

colin 244

te2008
22nd Sep 2011, 09:21
kee for brains? :D

I thought kee means toilet

----------


Either way, te2008, not edifying in the least if this is what you heard from said mother-in-law.

Next time you are handing out the 1000 baht notes, make sure she misses her turn. :)


I would never dish out 1000 bahts:lol:

bifftastic
22nd Sep 2011, 11:18
I thought kee means toilet


kee ขี้ (this word has a falling tone) means one of the things you do in the toilet :) it also, confusingly, means a personality trait someone might have. Like you can say that someone is 'kee mao' ขี้เมา which means they have a tendency to be drunk
(p iss-head, I believe we call them!)

Also, there is another word 'kee' ขี่ (notice the different tone symbol above
the letter?) this word has a low tone and means 'to ride' as in a horse or a motorcycle.


So, to say "ride a motorcycle" you would say "keeขี่(low tone) motorsai"
to say that you've just passed a motorcycle through your bowels you'd say
"keeขี้(falling tone) motorsai" :)

Easy innit? ;)

te2008
22nd Sep 2011, 16:04
Kee = Pooooo

Chi Chi = pee:D

millermac
22nd Sep 2011, 20:47
Kee = Pooooo

Chi Chi = pee:D = yeow :D

KhunIanB-UK
22nd Sep 2011, 21:28
"Chi Chi = pee:D "

Don't want people thinking the thread is going down the toilet, but

Is ching chong the same meaning as never heard of chi chi before?

"kee ขี้ (this word has a falling tone) "

It certainly does :cool:

bifftastic
22nd Sep 2011, 21:36
Ok, tempting as it may be to remain in the ห้องน้ำ hong naam (bathroom), I'd like to ask about, or discuss, the use of the word ยัง 'yang'.

It was quite hard for me, at first, to answer the question กินข้าวหรือยัง 'gin khao reu yang?' (have you eaten yet?) correctly, when I wanted to say 'no, not yet'

Saying 'yes, I've eaten already' is quite straightforward กินแล้ว(ครับ) 'gin leaw (khap)' but if you want to say the opposite, it's quite tricky for us speakers of English.
ยังไม่ได้กิน 'yang mai dai gin' :)

It would be quite easy to assume that ยัง is a direct substitute for the English word 'yet'

Which would apply to the phrase ยังไม่พร้อม yang mai phrom (not ready yet)
But not to the phrase ยังกับ yang gap (as if; like; as; as though) or ยังคง yang khong (still)

My dictionary (http://thai-language.com/id/131369) describes ยัง (yang) as yet; since; not yet; still

so, it's 'yet' and 'not yet' ? :confused:

I have to admit ผมยังไม่รู้ครับ! ​I don't know yet!

Your thoughts...:wai:

colin244
22nd Sep 2011, 22:15
Your thoughts...:wai:

My thoughts are you know more Thai than me biff ;)

colin 244

bifftastic
23rd Sep 2011, 00:55
"Chi Chi = pee:D "

Don't want people thinking the thread is going down the toilet, but

Is ching chong the same meaning as never heard of chi chi before?

"kee ขี้ (this word has a falling tone) "

It certainly does :cool:

yes it is the same ฉิ้งฉ่อง 'ching chaawng'

Unsurprisingly, there are a number of words (http://thai-language.com/id/138777) for the same thing!

I didn't know most of them till I looked them up.

bifftastic
26th Sep 2011, 15:59
Loud, Red and watermelon;


we've drifted again, in another topic :)

The word 'dang' ดัง meaning 'loud' contains the consonants ด (the 'd' sound) ง (the 'ng' sound) and the vowel อั (the little symbol at the top) which gives the 'a' sound (as in the English word 'bang'), hence ดัง says 'dang'

The colour red is 'si daeng' สีแดง ('si' สี is the classifier for colour) this classifier is often left out when it's not needed, as in 'moo daeng' หมูแดง (red pork).

There is a difference in pronunciation between ดัง and แดง. The vowel แ is pronounced with a more open sound than อั, as in the English word 'air' and is written before the consonant.

Watermelon is 'dtaeng-mor' แตงโม and has a a slightly different 'd' sound ต (there's a little indent in the top of the symbol) which is like more of a 'dt' sound with the tongue pressed against the teeth.

These differences are very subtle and can be difficult to hear, especially when people speak quickly.

:)

colin244
26th Sep 2011, 22:28
Err Biff not sure what your work is here but I think your in the wrong job unless you are a Thai teacher in the UK ;)

colin 24

bifftastic
26th Sep 2011, 23:28
Thanks Colin.

I would say that my Thai skills are pretty basic to be honest, although I am learning to read, which I strongly recommend anyone learning the language to start to do pretty much as soon as they can.

As for me being in the wrong job, well yes and no! I currently work on a railway :) and whilst it isn't the most stimulating of professions, it has decent pay and a generous holiday entitlement which has allowed me to discover my second home, meet a large number of really wonderful people and marry one of them!

So it will do for now!

colin244
27th Sep 2011, 00:09
Biff,

I think you underestimate your capabilities ;)

Chok Dee

colin 244

bifftastic
27th Sep 2011, 00:45
These three words demonstrate quite well that, in Thai, a different tone, means a different word.

เสื้อ seua(F) Shirt เสื่อ seua(L) Mat, (as in on the floor) and เสือ seua(R) Tiger. (I've put the tone in a bracket next to the word)

In English, we don't have any way of marking a tone for a word, because we use tones for emphasis rather than different meanings.

Someone told me of a great way to remember these;

A shirt, you pull over your head, so it's a falling tone, a mat, lies on the ground, so it's a low tone, a Tiger jumps up at you, so it's a rising tone.

Easy innit? :D

Phetchy
27th Sep 2011, 04:03
Just an observation, but as many farangs dismiss the learning of Thai as too complicated because of the different tones for essentially the same word, they are wrong. The tonal inflections actually help differentiate words. In Biff's example if you hear the phrase 'rawang suea' and recognise a rising tone, you should know that you should be on the lookout for a tiger and not someone in a loud shirt. Compare this with English and we too use the same word and pronunciation for many things. One that springs to mind is right, rite, wright, write - all pronounced exactly the same and only differentiated by context. So the Thai system seems to make it a bit easier rather than complicate things. I realise that the tones are often lost in speech (particularly when it's quick) and context plays a part, but it's a good idea to learn them if you can.

----------


Loud, Red and watermelon;


we've drifted again, in another topic :)



PS I thought it was Herbie Hancock who did the watermelon song, not Lou Reed?

bifftastic
27th Sep 2011, 09:41
PS I thought it was Herbie Hancock who did the watermelon song, not Lou Reed?

:D:thumb:

ddwjg
27th Sep 2011, 13:19
Biff has given 3 examples of 'seua', but it is my understanding there are a lot more than 3.

Dave.

bifftastic
27th Sep 2011, 13:50
Really? That's interesting! I'd like to hear about them :)

ddwjg
27th Sep 2011, 14:32
Biff sorry, I should have addressed that last post to you as a question.:wai: When I read it now it seems rude.

And, in answer to your question, I'd love to tell you but I can't.

I was of the understanding that "seua" has the most different pronounciations of any Thai word, although I don't even know the correct phonetic spelling, of the other same sounding words. I have no knowledge of Thai letters, and any post in which you include Thai letters/symbols, as examples don't help me at all. My loss.

When I was learning the 3 different pronounciations of "maa" i.e come, dog, and horse, and I was moaning about it, I was then given an example of seua with many more, and told to be happy that maa only had 3 different.

It stuck in my mind, that is all.

Maybe Maokaang can help with the others.

Dave.

bifftastic
27th Sep 2011, 16:47
Dave, it didn't seem rude to me :)

There are many issues with using Roman letters for Thai words. One of them is that there isn't a 'correct' way to do it!

We can't indicate tones with them, and we have to use a small number of vowel symbols (5) and we combine them to make all the sounds (like 'ou' in the word 'sounds'!) The other issue is that other languages use the same letters, and they use the same combinations of vowels to make different sounds ('ou' in French is a different sound to 'ou' in English)

If you learn the Thai script, you will find that it is designed to describe all the sounds you need to make to pronounce things the right way in the Thai language.

I will try to find out the 'seua' words, it's possible, as with 'daeng' and 'dtaeng', that they may have different spellings as well as tones.

Now you have spiked my curiosity! :D

Oh and by the way, moaning about tones won't help :lol: Just as moaning about the pronunciation of 'rough' through' 'thoroughly' and 'brought' won't help either"! ;)

dan&ploy
28th Sep 2011, 00:16
Was it Rama IV that suggested the Thais drop the tones to allow them to be more internationally accepted, (and rely on context)?

My favourite example of tone differences is not the usual 'mai' sentence but 'ya', medicine, grass, etc. No idea which is which so I rely on having sufficient vocabulary for the listener to get the context. That is how we obtained a paternal grandfather from my last visit to the pharmacy. And he smells and they won't take him back.:shrug:

Of course the Thais do rely on context when singing Thai as the tones can no longer apply so it just proves they can do it if they try and are just making life difficult for us! :rolleyes:

Off to the market now to order a kilo of mussels. I don't mind doing this as Ploy is away in Korat today and if I make a mistake I certainly don't mind the alternative.

Phetchy
28th Sep 2011, 05:16
Really? That's interesting! I'd like to hear about them :)

1) A litigant
2) Where the contents of your toilet end up.

ddwjg
28th Sep 2011, 05:38
Off to the market now to order a kilo of mussels. I don't mind doing this as Ploy is away in Korat today and if I make a mistake I certainly don't mind the alternative.

:lol::lol::lol:

Dave.

bifftastic
28th Sep 2011, 10:27
1) A litigant
2) Where the contents of your toilet end up.

1. I can't find
2. The garden? :)

guava
28th Sep 2011, 10:41
When I was learning the 3 different pronounciations of "maa" i.e come, dog, and horse, and I was moaning about it, I was then given an example of seua with many more, and told to be happy that maa only had 3 different. "maa" - the word for horse can also mean a stool (same spelling ม้า) and there are two other "maa" words one meaning to brew or ferment (spelling หม่า) the other meaning demon or ghost (spelling ม่าห์ )

I can only think of the 3 "seau" words that Biff has mentioned. There are, however, many combination words combining one of the "seaus" with other words to form another meaning.

Edit to add example:
Combine the "seau" word for shirt with the word for ghost and you get the Thai word for butterfly "pee-seau" (spelling ผีเสื้อ)

ddwjg
28th Sep 2011, 10:44
Bifftastiv. I think you missed phetchy's joke

A litigant = suer
Where the contents of your toilet end up = sewer.

Not your fault for not understanding. You will get used to it in time.

Dave.

----------

Guava, I don't disagree with the extra meanings you mention, but it is different sounds we are referring to.

Do your examples of stool, brew and ghost, use the same sound as the three I mentioned depending on context, or are they different pronounciations.

Dave.

KhunIanB-UK
28th Sep 2011, 12:09
"A litigant = suer
Where the contents of your toilet end up = sewer."

A Frenchman's hestitant explaination = So err
The wrong girlfriend = Sue Err

te2008
10th Oct 2011, 12:46
I would like to know about this:

พี่ติ๋ว สบายดีก่อจ้าว ..... เห็นภาพแล้วอยากไปแอ่วนอเวย์จ้าว

I did do a google trans, but the word in English is very strange

Gary & Nok
10th Oct 2011, 13:13
Bing Translate = Brother tio Well established chao .... see, I'd like to aeo Notre way chao.

Google Transalte = Tim was a good cause ..... I see someone and want to woo North Wayne King .

Not much difference, so who do I believe :confused:

ddwjg
10th Oct 2011, 13:15
te2008. My wife just translated it, as near as she could.

"Pi Diew(name), how are you? I see picture. I want to go holiday in Norway."

Best she could do. She did say that the writer is probably from Chiang Mai area by the way she writes. I'm not quite sure how she comes to that conclusion.

Dave

dan&ploy
10th Oct 2011, 13:38
want to woo North Wayne King

I am guessing that means someone wants to make advances to a Liverpudlian that likes pleasuring himself.

te2008
10th Oct 2011, 17:00
te2008. My wife just translated it, as near as she could.

"Pi Diew(name), how are you? I see picture. I want to go holiday in Norway."

Best she could do. She did say that the writer is probably from Chiang Mai area by the way she writes. I'm not quite sure how she comes to that conclusion.

Dave

You're right Dave. She is from Chiang Mai

guava
10th Oct 2011, 19:22
She did say that the writer is probably from Chiang Mai area by the way she writes. I'm not quite sure how she comes to that conclusion. From the use of the speach particle จ้าว (Jao) which is used all the time in Chiang Mai :)

te2008
13th Oct 2011, 12:19
"maa" - the word for horse can also mean a stool (same spelling ม้า) and there are two other "maa" words one meaning to brew or ferment (spelling หม่า) the other meaning demon or ghost (spelling )

I thought the word maa = mom in Thai

----------

เฮ้ จิกมีแต่งงาน เศร้าจัง = Someone is having a bad marriage

guava
13th Oct 2011, 12:28
I thought the word maa = mom in Thai
แม่ (mae, mair, mare or however you wish to spell it in karaoke language) = mom
- although มาดา (maa daa) = mother

Just goes to prove how impossible it is to understand Thai when written using English letters.

Tai
13th Oct 2011, 17:53
แม่ (mae, mair, mare or however you wish to spell it in karaoke language) = mom
- although มาดา (maa daa) = mother
Hi guava, you forgot "ร", it should be มารดา and pronounces "marn daa"

guava
13th Oct 2011, 19:27
Hi guava, you forgot "ร", it should be มารดา and pronounces "marn daa" Yes, indead มารดา (marndaa) does mean mother, but I did mean the spelling มาดา which is another word that I have seen used meaning mother (maybe from the English word "mother"?) it is in several dictionaries. Also another word มาตุ (maa tu) means mother :)

guava
13th Oct 2011, 20:02
Just found another Thai dictionary that lists ม่า (maa) as meaning Chinese mother!

Tai
13th Oct 2011, 20:38
Yes, indead มารดา (marndaa) does mean mother, but I did mean the spelling มาดา which is another word that I have seen used meaning mother (maybe from the English word "mother"?) it is in several dictionaries. Also another word มาตุ (maa tu) means mother :)

Oh, yes. that's right. But hardly hears anyone say it any more. And I've only seen มาตุ with other words, not on its own such as มาตุภูมิ = ma-tu-bhum (motherland) and มาตุฆาต = ma-dhu-kard (killing mother). No one would refer to their mother as either มาดา or มาตุ.

lamai
15th Oct 2011, 11:36
Oh, yes. that's right. But hardly hears anyone say it any more. And I've only seen มาตุ with other words, not on its own such as มาตุภูมิ = ma-tu-bhum (motherland) and มาตุฆาต = ma-dhu-kard (killing mother). No one would refer to their mother as either มาดา or มาตุ.


So in the Thai script dictionary, this means I had my child

ได้แฟนเด็กด้วยอิอิ
น่ากินชมัด
อิอิ
ไปนอนก่อนนะ

Tai
15th Oct 2011, 13:58
So in the Thai script dictionary, this means I had my child

ได้แฟนเด็กด้วยอิอิ
น่ากินชมัด
อิอิ
ไปนอนก่อนนะ

I don't get it. What are you trying to say? You know the meaing already or you are asking me what they mean.

te2008
17th Oct 2011, 11:45
I don't get it. What are you trying to say? You know the meaing already or you are asking me what they mean.

I think he wants to know the meaning

Tai
18th Oct 2011, 11:08
Thanks te2008, sometimes I just think too much or probably "light's on but nobody's home."

@lamai - here's the translation:

แฟน = (fan) boyfriend, girlfriend, husband (informal), wife (informal)
เด็ก = (dek) in this sense means young
น่ากิน = (na kin) looks delicious
ชมัด = (sha mud) to stress that something is extreme eg. ยากชมัด = extremely hard.
ก่อนนะ = (kon na) use in a situation that you're talking to someone and want to politely tell the person that you need to go now.
อิอิ = (ee ee) laughing sound

ได้แฟนเด็กด้วยอิอิ =(You) have got a young girlfriend/boyfriend, he he (as a laughing sound.)

น่ากินชมัด = (He/she) looks scrumptious.

อิอิ = He, he.

ไปนอนก่อนนะ = (I'm) off to bed now.

lamai
25th Oct 2011, 13:19
hello จบ
พี่ปุ๊นะจ๊ะ

Does this mean that I have finished work

Tai
25th Oct 2011, 14:39
จบ = (job) means the end, this case it could be someone's name
พี่ = (pi) refers to someone older
ปุ๊ = (pu) a name
นะจ๊ะ = (na ja) used at the end of a sentence, only you know the person well or sometimes when talk to children

so here it says:
Hello Job!
It's Pi Pu here.

lamai
26th Oct 2011, 11:54
Thank you so much and enjoy Wolverhampton....

te2008
2nd Nov 2011, 12:44
หวัดดีน้องปุ้ย
ดูรูปสาวเกาหลีแล้ว สวยมากเลย
เอ่อปุ้ยรบกวนถามหน่อยสิ
เคยไปพักแถวพิษโลกป่าวจ๊ะ
มีโรงแรมไหนแนะนำป่าว


Not sure about this, but when I am visiting my local Thai fish market and I say hello to the local people. This lady always reply with the word sound like " YENG or YANG" Does that word mean " What"

Phetchy
2nd Nov 2011, 12:49
It looks good.
Then see how much Korean.
But Gary knows little.
I've been to all the poison in it.
The hotel is on me.

I didn't know Gary had been to Hua Hin (or Korea)?

bifftastic
2nd Nov 2011, 13:56
หวัดดีน้องปุ้ย
ดูรูปสาวเกาหลีแล้ว สวยมากเลย
เอ่อปุ้ยรบกวนถามหน่อยสิ
เคยไปพักแถวพิษโลกป่าวจ๊ะ
มีโรงแรมไหนแนะนำป่าว


Not sure about this, but when I am visiting my local Thai fish market and I say hello to the local people. This lady always reply with the word sound like " YENG or YANG" Does that word mean " What"

The Thai text at the top says;

หวัดดีน้องปุ้ย wa-di nong pui (Hello Nong Pui)
ดูรูปสาวเกาหลีแล้ว สวยมากเลย doo ruup sao gaolee leaw, suay maak leui (I've seen the pictures (of/from) the korean girl, they're very beautiful.
เอ่อปุ้ยรบกวนถามหน่อยสิ eeu Pui rohp guwan taam noi si (yeah, I don't want to bother you but want to ask...) [I'm not 100% sure I've got that last one right!]
เคยไปพักแถวพิษโลกป่าวจ๊ะ keui bpai pak teaw pit lawk bao ja (ever been to the 'pit lawk' area?) [not sure that I've translated 'pit lawk' correctly but I think it refers to a place]
มีโรงแรมไหนแนะนำป่าว mee rohng rairm nai nae-nam bao? (are there any hotels you could advise me about?)

As for 'yeng' or 'yang' that depends what you've said to them in the first place. If you ask 'gin khao reu yang?' (have you eaten yet?) if no, then the answer is 'yang' (strictly speaking it should be 'yang mai dai gin' but 'yang' will often do)

Or, it could mean STOP! if you're about to step on her toes or something :)

Tai
2nd Nov 2011, 14:55
หวัดดีน้องปุ้ยกเลย
ดูรูปสาวเกาหลีแล้ว สวยมาสิ
เอ่อปุ้ยรบกวนถามหน่อย
เคยไปพักแถวพิษโลกป่าวจ๊ะ
มีโรงแรมไหนแนะนำป่าว

It should be spelled พิษณุโลก (pit-sa-nu-lawk.) Now you guys know it is a province. Sometimes people just say พิษ-โลก.


Not sure about this, but when I am visiting my local Thai fish market and I say hello to the local people. This lady always reply with the word sound like " YENG or YANG" Does that word mean " What"

If the person is form Isan I think it might be "หยัง" which could mean "what" or "how are you?" Not sure about its meaning though. Maybe someone from Isan could help with this one.

bifftastic
2nd Nov 2011, 14:59
Aaah พิษณุโลก :) thanks Tai!

te2008
18th Nov 2011, 17:51
Are they saying Noog Pui is crazy about food..Sometimes I am wondering about the Google Translator:confused:

พี่ปุ๊


ปุ้ยไม่มีเฟสหรอ

bifftastic
18th Nov 2011, 20:14
Are they saying Noog Pui is crazy about food..Sometimes I am wondering about the Google Translator:confused:

พี่ปุ๊
ปุ้ยไม่มีเฟสหรอ



พี่ปุ๊ Pi Bpu (someone's name)
ปุ้ยไม่มีเฟสหรอ Bpui Mai mee 'faet ror' Bpui hasn't got 'faet ror' or Bpui's got no 'faet' then?
Now, 'faet' เฟส, in my dictionary is shown as a loanword from the English word 'Phase' and หรอ is probably a kind of slang spelling of หรือ which is sort of like a question mark.

As to quite what the loanword 'phase' actually means in this context, I have absolutely no idea.

But the sentence says something like "So, Bpui's got no 'phase' then?"

Make of that what you will! :lol:

dan&ploy
18th Nov 2011, 21:23
I don't think it is 'phase' I think it is 'face'. Has Bpui lost face?

bifftastic
18th Nov 2011, 22:31
Whilst that is a tempting explanation Dan, it may not surprise you to know that Thai does have it's own word for 'face'

which is หน้า 'naa' and to lose face is เสียหน้า 'sia naa' (there are a few other versions as well)

Follow this link (http://www.thai-language.com/id/147686) to see the dictionary entry for เฟส .

Although the Thai letter ส (sor seua) is pronounced with an 's' sound at the beginning of a word, when it's the last letter of a word, it has a 't' sound.

I still don't know what the sentence means though! :lol:

bifftastic
20th Nov 2011, 07:26
I think I might have cracked it, with Dan's help :)

Dan, you were right...เฟส, I have been led to believe, is 'face' but as in Facebook rather than in the front of someone's head! :D

So, the sentence means 'Bpui doesn't have Facebook' or 'Bpui isn't on Facebook'

Teamwork ;)

Tai
20th Nov 2011, 09:00
Confirmed "face" (เฟส) is short for "Facebook" (เฟสบุ๊ค).