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  1. #1
    Premium Member KhunIanB-UK's Avatar
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    Default Translation Please?

    Please can someone translate this for me please?

    อยู่ข้างหลังเสื้อขาวหั่นเด้อเธอ

    ผัวมาสั่งก้าให้ไปแท้อ้อมอยากไปนำเด้น้อง
    Last edited by KhunIanB-UK; 23rd Dec 2013 at 18:35.

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    Default

    Just asked my stepdaughter she said it is Issan dialect. She is from chang Mai and does not understand.
    I asked her if she had any idea she said no. sorry I did try for you.

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    Veteran ผู้มีประสบการณ์ N Barton's Avatar
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    Jumpa is from Isaan and she says she doesn't understand it - or maybe she means she can't explain it to me.

    Something about a white shirt, having to carry something, and not going together.
    Sorry but that has probably confused you more
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    Forum Antiquity ของโบราณ bifftastic's Avatar
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    Default

    Something about the back of a white shirt and someone's husband trying to sort something out.

    Difficult without the context. There also might be spelling mistakes or words from different dialects.

    Where is the person who wrote it from? There's the word หั่น which could mean cuts or slices, but that doesn't make much sense in the sentence, so it might mean something else in a different Thai language.

    More info would be useful
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  5. #5
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Vam's Avatar
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    It's Issan dialect. The first sentence is "it's behind a white shirt".

    The second sentence is not clearly expressed. It seems to mean-
    "If your husband told you, that means he'd like you to go for sure".
    Probably the husband in this case told the wife to do something and that particular something will allow her to go somewhere with him.

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    Forum Antiquity ของโบราณ bifftastic's Avatar
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    Default

    I'd be interested to know what the หั่นเด้อเธอ part of the first sentence means
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    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Vam's Avatar
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    Default



    I had to get an expert, a native Issan speaker who also speaks excellent English, to sort this out. According to her, the sentences could be translated as:

    "It is behind that white shirt. Must be my husband who ordered it. Om (maybe a person's name) wants to go too."

    May I ask the OP, KhunIanB, if this makes more sense.

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    Premium Member KhunIanB-UK's Avatar
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    Thanks, yes, though I must admit it is still a bit confusing, but it is Issan and put together quickly.

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    Member สมาชิก Timbo's Avatar
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    If it helps... an alternative interpretation: hard to be 100% certain because out of context.

    Aom says:- Thats' you standing behind the the white shirt (maybe looking at a photo?). Your husband very brave/good to let you go. I want(ed) to go with you.

  10. #10
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Vam's Avatar
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    I suppose all our sources are Issan speakers-or else we wouldn't consult them. But what I don't understand is that how such a short message could fetch such varied interpretations, or differences in shades of meaning, from native speakers themselves. I wonder what can be deduced out of that?

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    Moderator Tobias's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vam View Post
    ... I wonder what can be deduced out of that?
    Perhaps it is written by a non-native speaker? Or even Google Translate!?
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    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ nigel&panada's Avatar
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    I don't know enough about the Thai language to comment with any authority ( it amuses the wife greatly that I can barely string 2 words together ) but Issan is a pretty big area and it could be that there are regional variations within it and the same word could have a different context in a different area, English has similar variations , if I used the word "teacake" then those of you from Yorkshire would know exactly what I was referring to, but many of you wouldn't so someone from Liverpool would not see the same context. I remember Pan told me about a year ago that her various nieces and nephews who are around 8 yrs old couldn't speak to each other until the ones from Ubon learned central Thai at school as previously they had been speaking Lao/Issan and the ones living in Bkk and Chonburi had only learned central Thai.

  13. #13
    Forum Antiquity ของโบราณ bifftastic's Avatar
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    There are variations in Lao-Isaan, but I think the main reason that snippets of conversations in Thai, and the dialects spoken in Thailand, have meanings that are not 100% clear is that Thai is extremely reliant on context.

    Personal pronouns are often not clear. In English, we would use I, me, he, she, etc. whereas Thai often uses interchangeable personal pronouns, and will use them in the place of names as well.

    So that, a sentence in English that says "I will speak to Billy (who's your older brother) about it and let you know" could end up as "Uncle (might not really be an uncle) will speak to older brother (or sister, or anyone slightly older than the subject) and let younger sister (or brother, or anyone slightly younger than the subject) know"

    Which, to the people speaking, will make perfect sense. People who are not party to the conversation will not know who is being spoken about.

    The context is everything. You kind of have to be there, or at least have the context explained, along with the parties identities, in order to be able to be 100% certain as to what's being said.

    Add to that the fact that conversation in Thai is a lot more abstract than it is in English, which is quite a direct language, and it is often quite difficult to get an accurate translation, and you can get an answer that reads like 'someone said to someone else that that thing they were talking about before might not be the same as it was before, maybe'.
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    Thanks, that makes it perfectly clear
    Lucky

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    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Vam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bifftastic View Post

    Personal pronouns are often not clear. In English, we would use I, me, he, she, etc. whereas Thai often uses interchangeable personal pronouns, and will use them in the place of names as well.

    So that, a sentence in English that says "I will speak to Billy (who's your older brother) about it and let you know" could end up as "Uncle (might not really be an uncle) will speak to older brother (or sister, or anyone slightly older than the subject) and let younger sister (or brother, or anyone slightly younger than the subject) know"

    Which, to the people speaking, will make perfect sense. People who are not party to the conversation will not know who is being spoken about.

    The context is everything. You kind of have to be there, or at least have the context explained, along with the parties identities, in order to be able to be 100% certain as to what's being said.

    Add to that the fact that conversation in Thai is a lot more abstract than it is in English, which is quite a direct language, and it is often quite difficult to get an accurate translation, and you can get an answer that reads like 'someone said to someone else that that thing they were talking about before might not be the same as it was before, maybe'.
    What adds to the confusion is sometimes a speaker would refer to himself/herself in the third person or use his/her own name instead of the pronoun "I". So you who knows nothing about the speaker could get quite puzzled.

    Well, every language has its own quirks! Even English does! Reminds me of this classic piece.

    http://tonydavis56.com/2013/10/05/qu...lish-language/

  16. #16
    Forum Antiquity ของโบราณ bifftastic's Avatar
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    Absolutely. English has some very strange spellings. Probably to do with the fact that it uses a foreign script that doesn't have enough vowels, and has it's roots in a few European languages as well as Latin and Greek.
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    1st Line , Can have two meanings " Someone who is standing behind the white shirt" or " something behind the white "
    2nd Line , the Lady named OOM want s to go with her if her husband will allow or permit .

  18. #18
    Forum Antiquity ของโบราณ bifftastic's Avatar
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    I'm still confused by this part

    หั่นเด้อเธอ
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    I agree that this is impossible to translate without the context. Although even with context I cannot see how หั่นเด้อเธอ can be translated. I think the consensus is that this is Esarn Thai, maybe because of the use of เด้อ, but is normally used at the end of a sentence and I cannot recall it being ever followed by เธอ.

    Just to show how wide a variation of translation can be, when I first read this my interpretation was....

    I am at the back (or behind) with a white shirt. My husband has instructed me to collect nong Day (a child called Day?)

    Although the word order and grammar don't really support that translation, that was my first interpretation

    Context is all when translating Thai.

  20. #20
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ nigel&panada's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bifftastic View Post
    I'm still confused by this part

    หั่นเด้อเธอ
    Bad spelling and or grammar ??, you only need spend some time on e-bay looking at stuff to realise that a lot of people have no concept of either 5555555.

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