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  1. #1
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    Default Holiday road-death toll soars despite authorities’ crackdown

    DESPITE TOUGHER action against law-breaking motorists, including the Army’s seizure of drunk drivers’ vehicles, the road toll during the New Year holiday remains higher compared to the previous year.

    http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30303436

  2. #2
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Lonerider's Avatar
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    There ain't much hope of the roads getting any safer if the Police stop people and then let them go
    This bloke had a bald tyre which is worn to the metal and they let him carry on after he promised to get it changed (likely story)
    I enjoy my time in Thailand and I get on with Thais I come in to contact with but when it comes to the roads/driving/riding motorbikes they are complete muppets with no regard for anyones safety or common road sense

    Wayne

    http://www.dailynews.co.th/regional/546621#

  3. #3

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    In all I have read in the past about vehicle seizures, it seems to mean that they get the vehicle back after a few days which is nothing more than a minor inconvenience. If seizure meant their vehicle will be crushed, it might concentrate a few minds. The fines always seem to be so paltry too. TIT.

  4. #4
    Forum Dinosaur ไดโนเสาร์ Flip's Avatar
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    Same thing every Christmas and New Year - Songkran is usually worse and yet the authorities do nothing meaningful. Its quite simple really - start administering the law. I read an article somewhere a while back in which a high ranking official was asked why this wasn't done. His reply was pittiful - apparently there are no traffic courts and no money to set them up...........crazy!

    The focus at the moment is on minibuses - following a horrendous accident between a minibus and a pick up truck that resulted in the deaths of 25 people. The papers and TV are full of the government's response - some of which is laughable some just wrong. They just don't get it!

    Various suggestions have been made, ranging from banning minibuses altogether to limiting them to local journeys. They want more people to use the larger public buses - ever seen what happens to one of them when they crash? And crash they will - its not the type of vehicle, its the way its driven.

    Don't get me wrong, I'm fully aware of just how crazy those minibus drivers are but that's the point - its them, not the vehicles.

    Thai's drive the way they do for a variety of reasons. Some just don't know how to drive. Some are just plain selfish. The driving test is a laugh and if you can't drive well enough to pass even that, you can always buy your licence. The police spend their time pulling up motorbikes and taking 50 - 100 baht of the riders for not wearing a crash helmet whilst cars whizz past at double the speed limit. There also seems to be a lack of basic survival instinct - they do things that you or I just simply wouldn't do. Then there's that old favourite - nobody moves over for emergency vehicles.

    I remember years ago, I was hanging back on the motorway to Chonburi because there was a Highway police car in front of me and I was already close to the 120kph limit. Cars were simply flying by on both sides of the patrol car and it did nothing.

    Traveling with my ex wife a few years ago and cursing a Thai driver for some craziness of other, I got the response of "they don't know darling"..........well they damned well should know.

    They'll rattle on for a few months about the minibus incident, maybe a few laws will be changed - maybe they will phase out minibuses but you can bet your bottom dollar that the death toll for next Christmas and New Year will rise again.

    There is no law on the road here and the standard of driving is appalling and the roads are extremely dangerous. I still drive myself here though because I feel its the safest method of getting about.

    If the law was enforced and say a points system introduced as we have in the UK - Bangkok's traffic problems would be solved within a month because 75% of drivers would have lost their licences.

  5. #5
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    Lack of enforcement especially by Highway/traffic Police is the main cause of the extremely bad driving habits of the majority of the drivers in Thailand, and i include some western drivers in this statement.

    Good driving behavior starts from an early age, and as nothing is done about students driving without helmets and 4/5 up on a m/c on the way to school.

    The death toll in Thailand is appalling, not just at holiday times but all year round, the mini bus ' accident' did not occur because is way a holiday, it was because 'its Thailand'.

    The rules need to be tightened up on public transport and other 'professional' drivers first, then spreading down onto 'normal' road users. MInibuses for public transport need to stopped immediately and a larger, safer, slower alternative be introduced with GPS,tachographs, a 'drivers hours' rule and emergency exits. Trucks need to be made safer, smaller and weight limits enforced.

    I make this post as a regular driver in Thailand, and as a retired police traffic patrol officer in the UK, who has seen the carnage first hand on the highway.

    Happy new year everyone and " Hey let's be careful out there"

  6. #6
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    One thing I dont miss about living there is the road. Saying that I have been in the Uk just on 2 months now and I have turned left when the lights were red twice now. I also found myself reaching for the hazard lights when I was going straight on. Bad habits are easy to pick up. That said the reasons for the death toll are the result of 2 things pure and simple.
    1. Lack of punishment
    2. Not many (if any) know how to drive or why they have to drive in that way. Its all just fun and speed and it won't happen to me mentality.

  7. #7
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    Found this 2013 figures

    http://roadskillmap.com/

  8. #8
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    The police here in Surin province set-up several, anti-drink driving check points on roads in and out of the villages around our district over the New Year period. Basically a few traffic cones, a gazebo with a table and a couple of chair. These were usually manned by an officer and a few volunteers from the village.
    I cycled passed one of these check points outside our village early on New Year’s Day. To my surprise, I was called over by the guys on duty. I was thinking to myself, what could they possibly want from a cyclist? However, they were having a few beers with a couple of chasers in their gazebo to celebrate the New Year. They had stopped me to share a drink with them to see in the New Year. They were all quite merry even though they were on-duty and it was before 8.00am.
    Last edited by Dylan; 17th Jan 2017 at 11:50. Reason: Typo

  9. #9
    Forum Dinosaur ไดโนเสาร์ Flip's Avatar
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    Yes, I was up in Surin just after New Year. There were checkpoints all the way down highway 24 and on to highway 2. I noticed though, that if you did want to pass through when you'd had a drink or were people trafficking etc, lunchtime seemed to be a good time to go through

  10. #10
    RSS Feed Bot T-UK's Avatar
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    RSS Feed Thailand road safety: Carnage on the roads

    The BBC's Jonathan Head looks at the cost to human lives of Thailand's poor road safety record.

    Read full article ...

    (This post was generated automatically by Thailand-UK.com from the BBC News Asia RSS Feed)

  11. #11
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    RSS Feed Life and death

    The BBC's Jonathan Head looks into why Thailand's roads are among the most lethal in the world.

    Read full article ...

    (This post was generated automatically by Thailand-UK.com from the BBC News Asia RSS Feed)

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