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  1. #1
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ
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    Default Esol course 3 days a week

    I have found a local esol course 3 days a week, 6 hrs per day.

    My major concern is are these esol courses any good?
    My wife is currently employed, But the only english she seems to pick up from her work is all the swear words.

    We have discussed many times about her learning english, and she has set her mind from starting in the new year.

    Personally i like her to try this 3 day full time course, as composed to a weekly 2 hour class that's also held locally.

    I am still waiting for a reply back from the Ystrad Mynach campus who runs the course, As there is confusion over course fees.

    This tutor seems to think my wife only has to pay £30, Which i am hoping for but doubt very much.
    As another weekly esol course in Pontypridd wants £200 per term.
    Thats for speaking and listening, And another days lesson is reading and writing.
    These lessons are only 2 hours long.

    So if she attended both days that's £400 per term

    Look forward to any replies
    Holty

  2. #2
    Member สมาชิก
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    Default

    My wife did ESOL course speaking, listening, reading and writing only 2 hours a week. She learnt quite a lot from it. And it should be free


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  3. #3

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    My wife starts on the 22nd of this month for three months and it's a pre entry course. The syllabus looks a bit off but it's four hours on Fridays only and it was £112. Probably worth it it to get her started.

    I will be checking what they are teaching her each week as they gave her an assessment back in February and I wasn't that convinced about that either. The good bit is they will send her up a class or two if the assessment was wrong.

  4. #4
    Premium Member sisaket's Avatar
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    If the courses are Accredited and taught by accredited tutors / trainers / teachers there is everything to gain if at the end of the day your partners learn and improve and or get Certifications.
    IMHO I think ESOL courses should be free to anyone on settlement visas due to the amounts being paid , but if they do need paying for, it will be fees worth paying ...
    I wish them every success in their courses.....
    bangkok mags

  5. #5
    Premium Member Tom & Nok's Avatar
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    Regarding ESOL course quality in England, if ESOL courses are offered through providers which receive government funding through the Skills Funding Agency (SFA) then they are inspected by Ofsted. The inspection reports are published on the Ofsted web site. Holty, Estyn (the Welsh "Ofsted") performs a similar quality monitoring function in Wales.

    Fees are often zero on college ESOL courses if an ESOL student/student's household receive certain means tested benefits. This excludes our Thai spouses and us because passing the Home Office UK settlement visa minimum income requirement places us above the means-tested benefits threshold. However, under the SFA funding rules, our spouses are charged fees at the "home student" rather than at the "Non-EU" student rate.

    My wife received four hours/week of free ESOL classes at Entry Level 2 through our London local authority's Adult Community Learning (ACL) Service. The quality of teaching was of a high standard and Ofsted judged it to be "Good" last year. I was impressed with the ESOL course and I now work as an ESOL volunteer with the ACL. As I am postgrad ESOL qualified, next week I will be assessing prospective ESOL students (Entry Level 1 and Entry Level 2) for the new academic year.

    My wife has also attended one day/week (10.00am - 3.30pm) at our local college and she has just received her Edexcel exam board Entry Level 3 ESOL pass certificates in reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The college's last two Ofsted inspections judged the ESOL provision to be "Outstanding". The cost was £200 per term and she was charged at the "home student fee" rate. She starts Level 1 ESOL next week, again at £200/term. Level 1 corresponds to GCSE grade bands D-G (or bands 1-3 under the new GCSE grade scheme).

    My wife has really enjoyed her ESOL courses, including the weekly homework assignments. She has made new friends, including other Thais, and her confidence in using English has rocketed. Like Sisaket, I also wish your spouses success (and happiness) in their ESOL courses.
    "I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men" Sir Isaac Newton

  6. #6

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    Tom. You seem to know a lot about the Skills Funding Agency rules. How do I find out if they apply to my wife please?

  7. #7
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rasg View Post
    Tom. You seem to know a lot about the Skills Funding Agency rules.
    Tom knows a lot about everything. He's had to jump through so many hoops he could enter the Olympics. Take note of what he says, good info.
    Have I Mentioned That I VOTED OUT

  8. #8

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    I was planning to. Especially if it saves a bit of cash.

    I'm not that convinced it will help her too much as it is going right back to basics. Literally starting with the alphabet. I think I have said this before but my wife's English is quite good and I'm worried that she'll get bored. She can read it reasonably well. Her vocabulary gets better every week. What doesn’t improve is her use of verbs which she speaks the Thai way in the one tense and gets in a mix up over the tenses when she does try because she has pretty much taught herself. She throws in extra words quite a bit. "I just to saw something", instead of "I just saw something".

    The big one is she chops the end off words. Effectively never finishing them the way we do and it confuses the hell out of people although it makes no difference to me at all. Cold becomes cole. Please leave a message becomes please leave a messa. The funniest that took me a minute or two to work out was a deli veri. It was the way she said it. She meant delivery...

    I found a language school via Skype where they have teachers who specialise in pronunciation and I wanted them to give her a couple of paid lessons to see how she got on. Sad that they wanted almost £500 upfront for a 15 hour course and I wasn't happy about doing that without knowing about the quality of the teacher etc.

    I just found the syllabus of the course and it is fully funded by the SFA and illegibility criteria apply. They don't mention want the criteria are...

    Some aspects of the course to me are a waste of time for her. Getting a job, using public services and living in the UK are not that necessary because I handle all that and I would rather they concentrated on her English.

    I have rambled enough.

  9. #9
    Member สมาชิก
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    Look on the skill funding agency web site that is what I did. Quoted it to our local college and we did not pay any fees


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  10. #10
    Premium Member Tom & Nok's Avatar
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    Hi Rag

    The SFA has just rebranded as the Education & Skills Funding Agency (ESFA) and so here are the new Education & Skills Funding Agency eligibility rules for 2017-2018.

    Section 44 on page 9 covers family members such as our spouses. As long as you are a UK/EU/EAA citizen and you have been ordinarily resident within the UK/EU/EEA for the last three years then your wife is eligible for home student fees. It's useful to know this because I recall that another member of this board had an issue with his local college refusing to charge his wife at the home student rate for ESOL classes. The college authorities apologised after they were made aware that they would be violating the SFA eligibility rules by doing this.

    First language interference in the acquisition of English as a second language is common - I sometimes have to remind Nok about using articles (a/an/the) and /r/ and /l/ substitution. The college ESOL Entry Level 3 course was excellent in improving her use of tenses, including the complexities of conditional tenses (e.g. "If you had got up earlier, you wouldn't have missed the bus"). However I've signed her up at our local college for a six week ESOL course of two hours per week on pronunciation to help. The course fee is £70 for a total of 12 hours which is definitely money well spent. There are also some excellent free British Council resources (ESOL Nexus) and I've used these in teaching - here's one about pronunciation.

    Hope this helps.
    "I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men" Sir Isaac Newton

  11. #11

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    Really useful information. Thank you.

  12. #12
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ
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    Thanks everyone for your replies, I will get my wife on the 3 day full time course.
    Very good points made.

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