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  1. #1
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Big AL's Avatar
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    Default Briton in motorcycle accident-no insurance

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-Thailand.html

    Another sad case of someone in a motorcycle accident and having no insurance.

  2. #2
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    2 in 3 days, with the guy from down south was it phuket.

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    Unfortunately it's a regular occurrence here and I wonder why this case has made it into the British press.

    I was at an Embassy focus group a few weeks ago on the subject of non insured Brits being hospitalised. The deputy ambassador was there plus the Consul and her boss covering Asia and his boss covering the world from Whitehall. They are concerned and wanted to understand why Brits were traveling or living here without insurance. The answer is obvious and is purely financial.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by James HKT View Post
    They are concerned and wanted to understand why Brits were traveling or living here without insurance. The answer is obvious and is purely financial.
    From what I have seen of Brits here that is the answer. People spend hundreds of pounds on a flight, and haggle over a baht or two for a taxi, hotels, beer, women lol and it would only follow that insurance is in there also.
    I doubt you get in travel insurance anymore if you ride a motorcycle here, if that is the case then it could be another reason why they don't buy insurance as many hire bikes here.
    To back up the financial basis, the pound is way down not only from the days of 72 up but the bad days when it was 55 and a bit.
    Wages have not gone up in the UK but the cost of living has by all accounts. Prices in Thailand are up and up more if you like the western food and restaurants. People especially young males still crave that Thai experience and it is just not as affordable as it once was. Saving every penny / baht seems top be the order of the day.

    As it can be seen though the cost of not having insurance is high. The cost of being inexperienced with driving in Thailand, the inexperience of bike /scooter riding and the well known fact of 99.9% of UK tourist leave their brains somewhere at the airport not long after landing in Thailand is much higher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jimmbo60 View Post
    .......................the well known fact of 99.9% of UK tourist leave their brains somewhere at the airport not long after landing in Thailand is much higher.
    So true which is why most expats avoid them. Brits aren't the only ones, it's most tourists really !

    The phrase " som nam na" comes to mind.

  6. #6
    Forum Dinosaur ไดโนเสาร์ Flip's Avatar
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    I've had a bike since I was 11 years old and have one in the UK and one in Thailand at the moment. I've lost several friends in the UK over the years - almost exclusively down to the way they ride. I have my moments the same as most bikers - its hard to ride a powerful bike within the speed limits. But I think the reason I've never had a serious accident on a bike is down to the way I ride. My eyes are always 1/2 a mile up the road, reading the situation and likely scenarios - I adjust my riding accordingly. There is no getting away from it, you are very vulnerable on a bike and far more likely to suffer injury if you crash.

    I ride in exactly the same way in Thailand except that if I see a pick up truck 1/2 a mile up the road, approaching from a side road, I don't just think he may pull out without giving way - in Thailand, I know he will. An experienced motorcyclist or one with proper training will know this and they should also know Thailand's reputation for crazy driving and adopt the same style of riding as I describe above.

    That's as it should be but what I see is tourists who've never ridden a bike before getting holiday rentals and wobbling up the road. In places like Pattaya I see foreigners, some of which have also probably never ridden a bike before, taking their life in their hands and riding like idiots through heavy traffic.

    I once rented a Yamaha R1 in Pattaya and was never asked for my licence - I just can't imagine an inexperienced rider getting on one of those and riding off into the sunset but I'm told they do. Then, again in Pattaya, I've seen young-ish foreigners pulling wheelies along beach road - probably drink or drug fuelled behaviour.

    So I'm in agreement with the above, most of the time its their own fault and even where another driver has been at fault, a lot of accidents could have been avoided by reading the road correctly.

    The one thing I'll never get used to in Thailand is the behaviour of Thai riders - and I'm talking here about those on small bikes - mainly 50 to 150cc. They seem to think they have some kind of force field around them and do things that completely defy the rules of self survival. They set off out of side roads without looking - putting their trust in Buddha. I often comment that its as if their head is fastened to the handlebars with a bracket - preventing them from turning it and looking. They go through lights at red all the time and generally behave like idiots. I doubt they've had any formal training but you'd think the amount of friends that they've lost would tell them something? That, I stress is what I see of those who ride small bikes.

    Big bikes are rapidly growing in popularity in Thailand and so far, in the main, I've been very impressed by the standard of riding from Thai's on big bikes. Now, I'm sure there will be some who disagree and who's thoughts go to the 'nutters' that overtook them on the highway last week. I'd take a guess that those who think that way are not bikers. It may sometimes look dangerous but an experienced rider knows what he can and cannot get away with. As I say, I've been impressed by the standard of riding on big bikes and I'm amazed at how, in a boiling hot country, they take safety wear so seriously. I have a two piece armoured suit but usually only wear the jacket - its far too hot for me most of the time and even when I wear the jeans, they end up strapped to the pillion seat after 30 minutes.

    Whilst its true that you are more vulnerable on a bike, because you are in the open, you are also more spatially aware and this should - should, go someway to counteracting the vulnerability.

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    Unfortunate to say the least but just highlights how important it is too have all embracing coverage in Thailand or wherever

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    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    I have been going to Thailand since 1999 and up until about 5 years ago I never contemplated hiring a motorbike out there as I just did not see the need, I could get everywhere I needed to on the baht buses.

    Oh how wrong was I, after taking that first plunge, it has opened up the world of Pattaya (my usual haunt) immensely. I only get a twist and go 125 click (or similar) so easy to ride even though I am an accomplished rider (RAC/ACU trained and instructor back in the day).

    Last time I was there (Dec/Jan) I was following a thread on Facebook about pies, yes pies, Cornish pasties too be precise, and I decided that I would track down this place that everyone was on about (Neaung's Pies) somewhere near Big C Extra on Pattaya Klang (for those that know Pattaya) and after further debates of who produces the best, 2 other places (The London Pie Company and Tinnies, both further afield in Jomtien area).

    All 3 places are located in places I would never have gone by baht bus or even a motorbike taxi. Having a motorbike allowed me to wander off the beaten track and do some exploring in pursuit of food satisfaction.

    Yes the roads are madness and drivers most of the time have no clue about actual road usage or safety but keep your wits about you, expect everything to jump out in front of you, exaggerate your intention to make any type of manoeuvre and you should be safe enough.

    There will always be idiots on bikes (Thai or foreign) showing of what they can do thinking the world has never seen anyone do that type of thing on a bike before but you will never explain safety to an idiot and this is where the world cleansing act comes in to force.
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  9. #9

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    I'm always swerving and riding erratically here in the UK, because of the state of our roads. I'm just trying to avoid potholes and sunken drain covers, I often wonder what car drivers around me think. It's the same in Thailand. Though riding around Koh Samui on a 125 I'm sure the roads were generally much better than ours, most fun I've had, stopping where ever I like and limited to 60 (on clear stretches), but was I insured properly? I highly doubt it.
    Last edited by marshall; 23rd Mar 2018 at 14:38.
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    Quote Originally Posted by James HKT View Post
    So true which is why most expats avoid them. Brits aren't the only ones, it's most tourists really !

    The phrase " som nam na" comes to mind.
    Just today I was asked by a foreigner to help with a problem with a bike. He had been stopped at a bike check point here in Pattaya. The bike had been impounded because it was not registered, he had no bike licence, was not wearing a helmet and he had no proof of ownership. Would you dare do this in the UK, would you think you wouldn't get caught in the UK. Just a bit of proof of brain at airport syndrome LOL

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flip View Post

    Big bikes are rapidly growing in popularity in Thailand and so far, in the main, I've been very impressed by the standard of riding from Thai's on big bikes. Now, I'm sure there will be some who disagree and who's thoughts go to the 'nutters' that overtook them on the highway last week. I'd take a guess that those who think that way are not bikers. It may sometimes look dangerous but an experienced rider knows what he can and cannot get away with. As I say, I've been impressed by the standard of riding on big bikes and I'm amazed at how, in a boiling hot country, they take safety wear so seriously.
    I agree, when we went to Rot Fai Market Ratchada the bikers were there in full force, leathers and full face helmets. What I don't know, what and how many drinks they were having before getting back on their bikes.

    I reckon, most tourists who rent a bike in Thailand have probably never been on a bike before. only adding to the madness.

  12. #12
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    I think you will find that most "big bikers" only doll themselves up in full protection when we go on a long ride. Normally when it's just hacking around locally anything will do, t-shirts, flip flops etc.

    Really the problem is the tourists who have no idea how to ride and no idea what the local road rules/customs are. Yes the Thais do drive and ride in an archaic way, but once you understand it there is method in the madness. They do come racing out of side turns without looking but on the main road we expect this and don't hog the very left side of the road.

    Maybe I've been lucky, I live in " on paper" one of the most dangerous parts of the country, have a big bike, have a small bike, have a big SUV and have never had a problem.

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    Forum Dinosaur ไดโนเสาร์ Flip's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James HKT View Post
    I think you will find that most "big bikers" only doll themselves up in full protection when we go on a long ride. Normally when it's just hacking around locally anything will do, t-shirts, flip flops etc.

    Really the problem is the tourists who have no idea how to ride and no idea what the local road rules/customs are. Yes the Thais do drive and ride in an archaic way, but once you understand it there is method in the madness. They do come racing out of side turns without looking but on the main road we expect this and don't hog the very left side of the road.

    Maybe I've been lucky, I live in " on paper" one of the most dangerous parts of the country, have a big bike, have a small bike, have a big SUV and have never had a problem.
    Can't say I'm any different riding around home - jeans and t shirt but never flip flops But then, I'm not doing 120kmh around home and I'm always on the look-out.

    But you are probably right James - living where I do (in Thailand) there are very few locals with big bikes and most of the ones I see are Thai tourists on their way up to Isaan, they are almost always properly togged up.

    I'd never say there is any method in their madness. How many times have you stopped because there's some form of hazard or blockage in front? Do the Thais stop? No, they go down each side of you, oblivious to why the traffic stopped. Last year I'm driving along, 2 or 3 cars in front of me stop, I slow down and crawl up to the stationary traffic at which the car behind me pulls out and goes down the outside of us all at speed - straight into the reason we had stopped - a car had been waiting to turn right and the idiot hit him as he started the manouvre. They just won't wait for anything.

    When the traffic's heavy on the expressways they form additional unofficial lanes, usually down the inside but sometimes down the outside as well and go speeding past. A few km further down the reason for the traffic comes up - maybe road works or an accident so they then try to push back in - resulting in a hideous bottleneck - nobody gains anything.

    These days I don't stop at pedestrian crossings because I'm actually likely to get someone killed by doing so. I stop, pedestrians start to cross but cars and bikes in the other lanes keep moving. Sometimes you have to drive/ride the same way as they do and I hate that.

    I don't see much method in that but what I do see is the most selfish drivers I've ever come across. I guess their behaviour comes about because of a lack of policing. It would probably happen in the UK if our police were as lax as the Thai police are.

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