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  1. #141
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Fruit Tree

    Does anyone know what the fruit on this tree is? I've personally never seen anything like it. This mature tree is in the wild, so to speak, but inaccessible from where we were. The fruit was growing in strands from the trunk of the tree as well as along it's branches, I would estimate the fruit to be the size of an apple. It's by a reservoir in Wang Nam Khiow, about 40 minutes south of Korat.







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  2. #142
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    Possibly something not edible seeing as it is still on the tree and not been taken to sell
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  3. #143
    Premium Member Tom & Nok's Avatar
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    Hi Caller

    According to my lovely wife, this is called "makduah" in Thai.

    Putting on my biologist's hat, it's a member of the Ficus genus (family Moracea). It can be tricky to identify species within this genus so I'll just stick with the scientific name of Ficus spp. for the moment but it is definitely a species of fig.
    "I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men" Sir Isaac Newton

  4. #144
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom. If it's a fig, it's presumably edible?

    My initial reaction was the same as Gary's, as that's what the gf said as well!
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  5. #145
    Premium Member Tom & Nok's Avatar
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    Well, it's a pretty big genus (around 850 species) and the one that people cultivate is Ficus carica (the common edible fig).

    I'm inclined to think that this particular species is probably distasteful for humans for the reasons that Gary & Nok and you suggest. Otherwise people would harvest it. I do know that some Ficus species have a strong laxative effect and can also provoke allergic responses in people. That said, these fig species play an important role in forest ecosystems as they provide food for a wide range of fauna - insects/caterpillars, bats, birds and monkeys.
    "I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men" Sir Isaac Newton

  6. #146
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    My wife says that some people pick them, dry them and use it as a laxative, as Tom says.

  7. #147
    Premium Member Tom & Nok's Avatar
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    An update!

    My lovely wife has just finished her regular chat on LINE with her aunt in Korat, and she happened to mention these wild Thai figs.

    Her aunt says that the way to tell if they're edible is to open one up to see if there's an insect inside eating it. If there is, then that means the wild figs on that tree are edible. If there's no insect then do not eat the wild figs from that particular tree. I'm not sure that I would regard this as wholly reliable!

    I look forward to testing this interesting hypothesis when my lovely wife and I next stay in Korat. I shall, of course, have a supply of Andrex on standby just to be on the safe side !
    "I can calculate the movement of the stars, but not the madness of men" Sir Isaac Newton

  8. #148
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    Braver than me Tom

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  9. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom & Nok View Post
    Her aunt says that the way to tell if they're edible is to open one up to see if there's an insect inside eating it. If there is, then that means the wild figs on that tree are edible. If there's no insect then do not eat the wild figs from that particular tree. I'm not sure that I would regard this as wholly reliable!
    My wife loves going out collecting mushrooms, bamboo, various insects, etc when she's home and that has transferred over here. In the summer we're out picking wild blackcurrants, raspberries, strawberries and brambles, in the autumn it's mushrooms.

    I was wary about her picking unknown, possibly poisonous, ones so I bought her a UK wild mushrooms book, she told me, like Noks aunt, it wasn't necessary because her father told her if an animal/insect has been eating them then they're ok for human consumption and that was how she would know what ones were safe... I asked her if it's ok to eat the cow pats because there's loads of insects eating them.. she now uses the book.
    Last edited by Scot; 4th Jul 2015 at 01:04. Reason: Added an s, or is it a s?

  10. #150
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    So three months after I thought they would be ready to eat in a few day's, the banana's will finally be ready to eat in a few days time! The tree has gone, as apparently, they're only good for one bunch and no-more, but we've a few others at various stages of growth.

    There's a lady lives opposite who is good at all things horticultural so she came over to chop the banana tree down. She generally looks after the poor excuse of a garden we have in any case. On one side is her indoors mini jungle where, apart from Banana, she has some young papaya trees, some lime, some bean things, chillies and herbs. I've probably missed some off (mango?).

    My side is the front of the house, but I haven't a clue what to do with it? Before I arrived she built a raised sort of covered area, in addition to the already raised standing covered area that is in front of the double doors, which are never used. She thought I would like to sit out there. I don't see why, all there is to see is the smaller houses opposite. It hardly matches my view sweeping across the valley that my home in England benefits from, nor the feeling of space I have in the 80' back garden. But the main problem with it is the space it takes up in an already small area (for me), on what is the typical 60 wah plot. So far I have eight plants, two from the lady opposite and what I bought myself, plus there is an unkempt rose bush, that just as with the banana trees, seems to need no looking after whatsoever.

    If we decide to stay here, I'll knock the newly built covered area down and hard cover the whole area of my side of the garden and with the exception of a couple of trees, just grow things in pots - lots of them, of all sizes and shapes, plus find myself a sala type contraption to sit outside in, as I fancy (just in case).

    Anyway, back to the banana tree - here's our fearless heroine taking sword to tree - well kitchen knife actually. The ants in these things are something else - a good six inches long. I soon felt itchy and after taking a few snaps retreated to the safety of the house!









    Notice in this next photo, next doors dog sneaking in. He's left outside most of the time and the lady in the photo, who has three dogs of her own, who never, ever leave her yard, feeds him and I give him and the lady's dogs treats as well. The dog is often in a poor state skin wise and isn't really taken care of. I suspect he's trying to adopt me as he wanders in any chance he can.







    The ants!



    They now have to rest for a few days to yellow a bit. I've haven't looked under here. I've no idea what I'll find! It's just as well I like bananas though!!

    Last edited by caller; 20th Jul 2015 at 08:08.
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  11. #151
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ
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    When you say the tree has been cut down I think you mean the particular shoot they were on as another of the shoots will now grow and fruit.
    The ants look like weaver ants, these are really good for the garden, we don't have any in the new house garden so we have pests eating everything, these ants eat all the pests so you get great veggies, though they bite a bit when you destroy their habitat.ie. cut down banana trees or uproot beans they love the aphids that kill the beans. They like to nest in Mango trees and weave the leaves together.

  12. #152
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    I will bow to your superior knowledge Das, I really don't know, but I've been told the tree came down. It's certainly conspicuous by it's absence today and things are a lot tidier out there!

    I have to confess I never noticed the ants before, despite rummaging around that little jungle and under the trees to water the other things that need watering. I was taken aback by the sheer volume of ants there were. I might have a look tomorrow to see if they're still around!
    'Tis me

  13. #153
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    Look in a normal sort of tree with normal shaped leaves and see if you can spot a small ball of leaves pulled together, cricket ball size, try to leave them alone if you can, they are quite docile unless threatened, if the nest is touched expect war which you may not win. My daughter used to keep them as pets at the old house and they rarely bit her. I always got bit though when picking the mangoes high up in the tree. I once tried to take a nest to put in my garden didn't get far in fact didn't get it off the tree, they pack quite a bite the soldiers.

  14. #154
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Hello Das, thanks for the tip again. Couldn't see anything like you describe, which I was slightly relieved about! Anyway. here's a very poor photo of the chopped tree, which show the other shoots that are still growing, so I get what you were saying now.

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  15. #155
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Knocked down a bike yesterday.

    Thankfully, it was stationary at the time and a rider wasn't attached to it.

    I parked my truck to collect some glasses from the opticians. Loads of space around me, nothing for at least 10 yards in front or behind. When I returned, it was the same, or so I thought. Turned the wheel right to move out into the road, when crunch! I noticed a helmet go up into the air, another crunch, lots of people turning to look at the source of the noise and then a chap running to pick up his bike!

    Now at this point I should confess that my other half has warned me to always check in front of the truck before I move off, so hands up on that one, but why oh why did the guy have to park it so close that I couldn't even see it? Especially with so much space around?

    To my surprise, the bike owner was very apologetic, wai-ing me and the like and I understood enough, or at least to figure out that his bike was okay and there were no problems.

    I drove off as quickly as I could. I lost some paint in the form of three scratches to my colour coded bumper, but no dents.

    It's a jungle out here!

    I haven't been in Korat much recently. I have been spending most time in Bkk including the whole of last week and again from this Thursday until the following Wednesday. All to do with the other half's work, which is for the Mall Group (Siam Paragon, Emporium, Emquartier and the various Malls). They're looking to introduce a new computer system to manage and connect all their stores and she has to represent her particular area of work in the various presentations, discussions and meetings from the likes of Oracle and SAP. Even though she is only one from her particular work area not based in Bangkok! Very strange - and costly.

    Plus my laptop crashed and this is the first post from the newly restored version. I'll update some stuff on Bkk soon, but now off to the dreaded dentists!
    'Tis me

  16. #156
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Gosh, is it really so long since I updated this thread - where does the time go? I think this forum needs some photos, so I'll add some in the coming days. In Bkk again at the mo (back in Korat tomorrow) and it looks like a more or less permanent move is on the cards, plus looking in Hua Hin. Well, they say a change is as good as a rest!

    So lots to look forward to, I think? But on the flip side, I can't help but look over my shoulder at what I hate most about living here - and that's an easy one. It's the stinking, rotting, festering excuse of a bunch of tin soldiers running this place and slowly tearing the soul out of it. I hope to God they go soon before it's too late to turn back and the Country can start moving forward again.
    'Tis me

  17. #157
    R.I.P. Thaddeus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by caller View Post
    It's the stinking, rotting, festering excuse of a bunch of tin soldiers running this place and slowly tearing the soul out of it. I hope to God they go soon before it's too late to turn back and the Country can start moving forward again.
    Firmly entrenched for the foreseeable future I fear.

  18. #158
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ johnb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaddeus View Post
    Firmly entrenched for the foreseeable future I fear.
    Indeed that is the way it appears. Not sure why anyone would prefer the previous bunch of "elected" politicians though.
    nao faz mal means mai pen rai

  19. #159
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    My wife says mawdaw too. She says you can eat it but it is very sweet and don't have many.

  20. #160
    Premium Member caller's Avatar
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    Back in August, I realised I'd messed up the dates on my OA visa, thinking it was valid for 12 months after entry, rather than the actual visa expiry date - ho-hum! This wouldn't have been an issue apart from the fact it needed renewing about the time I was planning to return to the UK for a couple of weeks.

    So it was off to the Cambodian border at Chong Chom, to simply slip in and out again and get a 12 month extension on my multi-entry in the process. It took 3.5 hours to drive from Korat to Prasat, primarily because of road works along a large stretch of the road past Buriram.

    This was a new experience to me, so I took a few snaps. At the border, we used the services of a local guy for little expense to ease our was through the out / in / out / in process to ensure we arrived safely back in Thailand!

    I arrived back with my original OA visa extended for 12 months until August 2016, meaning I haven't had to show any proof of income / savings to legally remain in Thailand since first securing my visa at the Thai Embassy in London before arriving here in September 2014. I think that's a good deal.

    On the way back, we stopped at a place called Staffords in Prasat, which sells farang food tied in with a restaurant where I ate a very nice pork steak with all the trimmings and it really was rather good, although they didn't have much in stock to buy. Forgot any photos, but recommended if you're in the area.

    Anyway, here's a few snaps of the border -

    Getting near and pretty unremarkable.



    Where the action starts. I wasn't allowed to photo the immigration offices, as such.



    Looking into Cambodia.



    Cambodian border crossing.



    The two resorts / casino's in no mans land, or maybe just in Thailand - hard to tell?





    And that's that for the border. After leaving and before reaching Prasat, there's a large market, selling all sorts, which was pretty busy. It can't be missed. On the other side of the road, hundreds of used bikes were for sale. Not sure how many of those would have been legally secured?



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