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Thread: Living in LOS

  1. #1
    Veteran ผู้มีประสบการณ์ Andy R's Avatar
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    Question Living in LOS

    Hi Peeps... Just dropping by with a few questions that may be able to be answered in a brief summary.
    A question rather something that will happen..
    How easy is it to live in Thailand now?
    Is there a lot of red tape or more?
    I'm sure the days of staying there on a visa and doing the visa run across the border have now more or less ended?
    So even though I'm married to a Thai it doesn't give me automatic residence...
    So what is needed?
    The question pops up a few times in conversation and I'm not getting any younger and probs need to plan for a move in a few years..
    Thanks in advance..
    Andy
    Nothing ever Changes...but the shoes!

  2. #2
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    Just starting the process myself Andy, although it'll be a couple of years before I'm there full time. Visas? Depends on your circumstances as to which one to go for.

    Actually, being married to a Thai does give you more advantages than it used to. Previously anyone who's cat had been stroked by someone who'd been to Thailand could get a multi entry Non Immigrant O Visa valid for 12 months and do visa runs every 3 months. That is now reserved for those married to Thai's with a few exceptions. If you apply for an O visa from within the UK you will now have to show an income of around £1200 per month. I am reliably informed however, that no proof of income is required if you apply in Laos.

    If you want to do without the visa runs, you'll need an O visa then apply for a 12 month extension in Thailand - in that case, I believe a single entry O visa is the easiest route. However, there are downsides to that route, depending on your particular circumstances.

    1. You have to show an income of, I think, at least 40,000 baht per month or have 400,000 baht in the bank. I believe the income requirement is actually a joint income but some immigration offices don't apply that. 2. You will have to report every 90 days although I'm told that is soon to go online.

    There is also the retirement visa option (OA Visa) but you need savings of 800,000 in the bank or I believe there is an income option on this one too - not sure how much it is. No visa runs but 90 day reporting and renewal every 12 months.

    On both types of visa where you don't have to do visa runs, the rules are applied differently depending on which office you are applying to.

    The above advice on O visas extended within Thailand is based on what I've been told when asking similar questions. I'm sure on of our ex pat members will be able to advise you more accurately.

    For me, as I return to the UK regularly a multi entry Non Immigrant O Visa valid for 12 months is fine. I am never there long enough to need a visa run. I've had one for years although I couldn't renew it this year as I am no longer married and the copy of my ex's passport I have on my laptop has expired . That situation will be rectified shortly

    I believe there is also a different type of retirement visa that needs visa runs - maybe someone else knows more about that.

    Residence? I've always been told there's more chance of hell freezing although my lawyer in Thailand has citizenship now.

    The Thai Consulate in Hull has a lot of information on applying from within the UK on its website but the rules seem to be applied differently in Thailand and in other countries.

  3. #3
    Veteran ผู้มีประสบการณ์ Andy R's Avatar
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    Thanks for your reply... It's answered a few questions for now. :-)
    Andy
    Nothing ever Changes...but the shoes!

  4. #4
    Member สมาชิก Steve S's Avatar
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    I've been here in LOS for nearly a year now on an O-A visa on the grounds of retirement.
    As a single man I had to show savings of 800,000B but other than that the requirements for this visa are the same, married or single, and can be found on the embassy website.
    No visa runs required. Just a quick visit to the nearby immigration office every 90 days to confirm my address.
    I was due to extend my visa next week but on my return from a short visit to the UK last week, I was given a further 12 months by passport control at the airport. Happy days for another year?
    Feel free to PM me, if I can answer any questions I would be happy to help.

  5. #5
    Veteran ผู้มีประสบการณ์ Andy R's Avatar
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    Thanks for the reply.. Without checking but how much in UK £ is that? I'm a good few years off retirement to be honest... But my original post was just out of interest and maybe planning for the future.. Although never planned for the future as have no real pension anyway.. I have a works pension that will pay minimal.. I tend to live for today..So not even sure I can save.. and with a wife who likes to spend..lol
    Andy
    Nothing ever Changes...but the shoes!

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    For long term stay, for over 50's a non-immigrant 'O'A' is available from Thai embassy in London a few more hoops, but gives a one year permission to stay stamp on each entry into Thailand, if you entry just before the expiry date of the visa a fresh one year stamp will be given, allowing 2 years stay in Thailand with the non 'O'A', 90 day reports will be required. see Embassy site here - http://thaiembassyuk.org.uk/?q=node/51. . Don’t forget that once your non 'O'A' visa expires you will need a re-entry permit for any trips out of the country, to keep your permission to stay stamp alive.

    for over 65's a non-immigrant 'O' gives a 90 day permission to stay stamp on arrival, available from embassy and consulates, proof of state pension is required. In the last 30 days of the entry a one year extension of stay from local immigration office is available, 800,000 baht or 65,000 baht monthly income is required in a local bank account in your name only, ( there is a combination of money in bank and monthly income method) money in bank has to season for 2 months on first application and 3 months on subsequent extensions. see embassy site - http://thaiembassyuk.org.uk/?q=node/49

    Men married to Thai national single entry non-immigrant 'O' visa ( 90 day permission to stay stamp on entry)are available from Embassy and consulates financials should not be required, but are stated on embassy website, ( lots of incorrect information re visa's on that site) multi entry only available from Embassy. Any 90 day entry can be extended ( during the last 30 days of entry stamp validity) at local immigration office for either 60 days , no financials required, of for one year 400,000 baht or a monthly income of 40,000 baht required ( no combination method allowed) money has to be in local bank account in your name only. No joint income allowed. money in bank has to season for 2 months on first application and 3 months on subsequent, extensions

    if staying on a one year extension, 90 day reporting is required, except on first yearly extension which counts as a 90 day report, this continues every 90 days unless the cycle is broken by a trip out of the country, then on first day back the 90 days count starts again.

    All yearly extensions must start with a non-immigrant visa, conversions from tourist visa or visa exempt entry can be obtained within Thailand from some local immigration offices 2,000 baht.

    All permission to stay stamps that extend beyond the visa expiry date require a re-entry permit to keep the extended permission to say stamp alive, available from local immigration offices 1,000 single one time only entry or 3,8000 baht multi entry, expiry date of the re-entry permit will be the same date as your latest extension/ permission to stay date. also available from main airports as a last resort/emergency

    All local immigration office extensions are 1,900 baht

    opening bank account in your name can be troublesome

    at today's exchange rate 800,000 baht is £18605 £1,400 for monthly income. £9300 lump sum, £930 monthly for married mans monthly income

    I hope this information is useful
    Last edited by steve187; 27th Oct 2016 at 01:46.

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    Hi.
    Can I ask if you have UK pensions paid to Thailand or did you go for QORPS?
    I am looking at transferring to HK who have a DTA adgreement with Thailand which means if I transfer to HK , there is no tax there so I get my full pension tax free in Thailand and no tax paid to UK. I need to plan this in advance before I get married and retire there :-)

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    Would a UK pension (state) be taxed in Thailand?

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    the state pension is taxable either in uk or thaland but not both. But private pensions transferred may be tax free if resident in Thailand and not UK, these are QROPS.

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    Under normal circumstances, i.e. no other form of income, a UK state pension would not be taxable as the income from it would be below the tax threshold. So, would it then be taxable in Thailand?

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    I have a government forces (not state) pension paid here in Thailand directly into Kasikorn Bank, I also let my house and fill in a UK tax return I take half of the rental and the wife the other half (Joint Acc) Nationwide. Together they would attract tax but after work done on the house, insurances etc. I find I get a tax refund from my savings in the UK usually about 100 pounds and pay no tax in Thailand due to the dual taxation agreement.

    If i sold the house I would not have to fill in a UK tax return and then perhaps I would incur Thai tax but only on monies paid directly into Thailand.
    Last edited by DAS; 2nd Dec 2016 at 03:27. Reason: extra info

  12. #12
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    Pensions, apart from state, would be taxable in either UK ot Thailand, your choice as there is agreement between UK and Thailand. Private pensions can be moved to other county, like HK (QROPS) then you don't have to pay tax at all.
    UK penson cannot be moved so you pay tax in UK at source or Thailand.

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