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  1. #1
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ RichardSt's Avatar
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    Default Wills & Inheritance

    Evening all,

    Been married to my wife just over 9 years and I have a will in place with her as sole benefactor as no children involved. It all goes to my brother currently if my wife has died before me, but half of the estate going to Thailand would potentially be very significant.

    If I were too add my wife's sister who lives in Thailand with Thai husband and young family, is this a straightforward process with names and dates of birth?

    At this time my wife doesn't have a will, so if she were to inherit the estate and die in the UK, would her family be entitled to inherit, or must she have a will in place nominating benefactors? How would it work with UK solicitors trying to find family in Thailand? Is there an international probate service that we would need to nominate in advance?

    Any advice gratefully received

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    Without a will the estate goes to the Government to sort out and believe me you do not want that, not only do you lose a lot in solicitors fees but the estate may not go to who you would want it to. Get your wife to make a will asap, even if it is just a temporary one.

    I have my wife as my benefactor but if she dies before me then her sister in Laos is named and a portion goes to her. All we have are her name, address and bank account details and it is down to the executor (not solicitor) to get the money to her.
    I'm ONE of the 52%

  3. #3
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    What's the default though?

    If you and your wife have kids and she dies intestate, would the assets get divided up between you and the kids or would her relatives in Thailand have any say?

  4. #4
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Big AL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary & Nok View Post
    Without a will the estate goes to the Government to sort out.
    The estate is divided in accordance with the rules of intestacy might be a better way of putting it. The Government does not do anything-unless you have no relatives, in which case the Crown keeps it all.

    - - - - - - - u p d a t e d - - - - - - -

    https://www.gov.uk/inherits-someone-dies-without-will

    The person who receives an inheritance is a beneficiary, rather than a benefactor.

  5. #5
    Veteran ผู้มีประสบการณ์ prikphet's Avatar
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    On mine the only way her family get anything is if we all snuff it, my brother then gets 85% and her brothers and sisters the remaining 15% (not the parents). Given the cost of living and how much I've contributed I think that's more than generous.

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    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ RichardSt's Avatar
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    Big Al

    Thanks for posting that link. If I answer the questions, theoretically, my wife's brother or sister would be in line to inherit without a will being in place?

    Does this apply to UK only? Or would Thai nationals living abroad still be covered by this?

    Clearly safer to have a will, but I'm not really clear now what the beneficiary chain is if I died and then my wife.

    Cheers

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    Perhaps a bad choice of words.

    When my dad died a solicitor was "appointed" to sort out the estate as he had not made a will and it was down to him to sort out who got what (presumably according to the intestacy rules).
    The problem was (in our case) relatives came out of the woodwork and started to correspond with the solicitor which of course he then billed the estate so the inheritance (not that there was much in the first place) dwindled quite significantly.

    But thanks Big Al for correcting my comments.
    I'm ONE of the 52%

  8. #8
    Furniture เฟอร์นิเจอร์
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    It doesn't take long or cost that much to do a will. In my situation when Nat passed away her family would have screwed me completely. Not the same situation as OP, but based on my experience get one done.

  9. #9
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardSt View Post
    Clearly safer to have a will, but I'm not really clear now what the beneficiary chain is if I died and then my wife.
    If your wife died without a will the estate is shared equally between the children or their descendants.
    If a son or daughter has already died, their children (the grandchildren of the deceased) inherit in their place.
    I'm ONE of the 52%

  10. #10
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Big AL's Avatar
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    A will doesn't cost too much for most people, but solicitors can charge a percentage of the estate and their hourly rate for the time spent. The total can be substantial.

    Consider also a power of attorney. Last summer my cousin committed suicide and died pennyless. He lived with his dad normally, but, at the time of my cousin's death, his father was in hospital, aged 92. The father had £20,000 in the bank, but his mind had gone. He could not write a cheque. I had to pay for my cousin's funeral-not something for which I had budgeted. Of course, a power of attorney would have been no good if the father had only appointed his son, so consider how may people to appoint and their ages.

    - - - - - - - u p d a t e d - - - - - - -

    Solicitors administering estates require proof of beneficiaries' ID for anti money laundering and other purposes. I have no idea how they would cope with beneficiaries in Thailand, especially if they could not read and write English.

  11. #11
    Forum Regular สมาชิกประจำ Ivan's Avatar
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    We used Will Aid to do our wills, basically you make a donation to the will aid charity and get your wills done. We donated £150 for two wills. I recommend it. Money goes to charity rather than a solicitors golf club fees ;-)

  12. #12
    Premium Member Gary & Nok's Avatar
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    If you are a Union member then they may have a free will writing service. I know Unite does.
    I'm ONE of the 52%

  13. #13
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    I would also point out that if either of you have property or other assets in Thailand, you will need a separate will in Thailand to cover those items.

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