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  1. #1
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    Default Following Citizenship, child of UK citizen becomes naturalised too?

    Hi all.

    The guidance at .gov.uk is not quite clear for me hence posting. I'd like to know if a child, under 18, of a naturalized person becomes a UK citizen too, not automatically (based on the criteria in the link below), but by another route/method as given in the 2nd bullet point of the 2nd block of bullet points in the link. I've *starred* the text I need explaining. This is the text:

    Your British parent could pass on their citizenship to you if they were one of the following:

    born or adopted in the UK
    **given citizenship after applying for it in their own right (not based on having a British parent)**
    working as a Crown servant when you were born (for example in the diplomatic service, overseas civil service or armed forces)

    Link: https://www.gov.uk/apply-citizenship...er-1-july-2006

    Thank you, Perdy.

  2. #2
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    Hi again all,

    I wonder if anyone has any idea at all on this matter? The links I posted don't make the decision clear. I've read other posts by Kingy and Vinny back in 2018, but Kingy's stepson was also present in the UK at the time of Mrs Kings's citizenship. Our theory was to try to achieve naturalisation for Mrs Perdy, then have her 8yr old son come to the UK as a naturalised child of a UK citizen. Is this how the system works or am I off target?

    Thanks in advance,
    Perdy

  3. #3
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    Smile Registration of a child as a British national

    Hello all... hello hello hello hello

    I think I've got somewhere with this. The situation being:

    1. Mrs Perdy is not yet a British National, here on FLR, 5yr route,
    2. She has a child under 18 who was born in Thailand,
    3. She will apply for ILR and then citizenship in the coming months,
    4. She assumes that she will become a British national,
    5. She wants her child to also become a British national and to come and live in the UK.


    The form required should be Form MN1. https://www.gov.uk/government/public...tizen-form-mn1

    The form covers the following (extract from the Accompanying Guidance but not including 'who is not included')
    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...m-mn1-guidance):

    Who is included in this guide and who is not included
    This guide assists children who have not yet reached the age of majority (age 18) to become British citizens under the following sections of the British Nationality Act 1981. Once a child reaches age 18 they will have to apply to naturalise using form and guide AN.
    This guide covers the following:
    • section 1(3) birth in the UK to parents who are now settled in the UK or have become British citizens
    • section 1(3A) birth in the UK to parents who have joined the armed forces
    • section 3(1) child whose parents are applying for British citizenship
    • section 3(2) birth abroad to parents who are British by descent and have lived in the UK or a British overseas territory
    • section 3(5) birth abroad to parents who are British by descent but are now living in the UK or a British overseas territory
    • section 3(1) children adopted abroad by British citizen parents
    • section 3(1) children whose parents had renounced and subsequently resumed British citizenship
    • section 3(1) any other case not listed below where it is considered to be in the child’s best interests to be granted British citizenship
    • section 4D birth abroad to parents serving in the armed forces. END

    It looks like Section 3(1) underlined above is the section needed and the application is made at the same time as Mrs Perdy's application. From pg13 of the guide:

    Children born abroad to parents who are applying for British citizenship
    Where one or both parents are applying for British citizenship they may apply for one or more children who are not automatically British at birth to be registered as British citizens as part of a “family application”. Children in this category will be considered at the Home Secretary’s discretion and will usually be registered only if both the parents are granted or already hold British citizenship, or if one parent holds British citizenship and the other is settled in the UK. END

    A family application to naturalise is quoted above by the author of the guidance. However, upon reading the Gov website, it clearly states that your child cannot be included on your application and must be made separately: https://www.gov.uk/apply-citizenship...-your-children

    I hope this post helps someone to be less confused than I was am.

    If I'm right or if I'm wrong with the above info, can someone please comment with a yay or a nay and an explanation? Have you had to go through this situation and navigated it successfully? If so, please let me know.

    Thank you in advance, Perdy and Family.

  4. #4
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    Anyone have experience please guys?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Perdy View Post
    ...I think I've got somewhere with this. The situation being:

    - Mrs Perdy is not yet a British National, here on FLR, 5yr route,
    - She has a child under 18 who was born in Thailand,
    - She will apply for ILR and then citizenship in the coming months,
    - She assumes that she will become a British national,
    - She wants her child to also become a British national and to come and live in the UK.
    Welcome back Purdy, lovely to see you here.

    Based on the information above, I assume your step-child is still residing in Thailand. In your circumstances, I think the best option (and perhaps the most inexpensive one) is to apply to have the child brought over after your wife has been granted ILR and before she applies to be naturalised as British.

    Your wife would then make an application for leave (in Thailand) for your step-child to join its mother in the UK, the child would then (if the application is successful) be granted ILE.

    Once the child is in the UK, your wife would apply to be naturalised as a British Citizen under section 6(2) (form AN) and with that application she would submit an application for the child to be registered as a British Citizen under section 3(1) (form MN1).
    Tobias - โทเบียส
    It’s better to be 6 feet apart than to be 6 feet under.

  6. #6
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    Hello Tobias, thanks for the reply and the explanation of the alternative.

    The route you've described could be taken prior to Mrs Perdy applying for ILR though right? I mean, her son could apply right now, come to the UK (with us meeting the financial requirement), then she could apply for ILR next year, and then naturalisation.

    I was wondering, if going by my initial route (Mrs Perdy becomes British Citizen), and then her son applies as part of her application for naturalisation, why might this be more expensive? Thank you.

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